Fellows

A Distinguished Network

Founded in 2007, CCL has organized eight classes of fellows to date, training 75 curators who serve museums across the world. Each year CCL selects ten to twelve applicants representing a wide range of geographic, institutional, and art-historical backgrounds.

Fellows become a unique cohort who undergo professional and personal growth together throughout the CCL experience and beyond. Our graduates add critical value to the vision and strategy of museums worldwide and form a network that fosters growth and collaboration.

Curator and Senior Researcher, Department of Painting and Sculpture

Dorthe Aagesen

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Institution

Statens Museum for Kunst, National Gallery of Denmark

Title

Curator and Senior Researcher, Department of Painting and Sculpture

Dorthe Aagesen is a Curator and Senior Researcher with the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Statens Museum for Kunst, National Gallery of Denmark in Copenhagen, where she has worked since 1999. She oversees the Museum’s modern collection, and has been engaged in ambitious reinstallations, while also organizing temporary exhibitions. Before 1999 she served as a curator for four years at Arken Museum of Modern Art. During her eighteen years of curatorial working experience she has contributed to fourteen exhibitions and published numerous articles covering a range of subjects within twentieth-century European art. Among the most recent are internationally acclaimed exhibitions, Asger Jorn – Restless Rebel (2014) and Henri Matisse – In Search of True Painting (2012, co-curated with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Centre Pompidou). Dorthe Aagesen completed her graduate studies in art history at Aarhus University in 1996, was a member of the Danish Agency for Culture’s council for Art History in 2008-2010, and on the board of NORDIK Nordic Committee for Art History in 2010-2012.

Associate Curator

Kathleen Ash-Milby

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Kathleen Ash-Milby is an Associate Curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in New York. She organized numerous contemporary art exhibitions at the museum including C.Maxx Stevens: House of Memory (2012) and Off the Map: Landscape in the Native Imagination (2007). She was the co-curator, with Truman Lowe, for Edgar Heap of Birds: Most Serene Republics, a public art installation and collateral project for the 52nd International Art Exhibition / Venice Biennale (2007). Ash-Milby is a recipient of a 2011 Secretary of the Smithsonian’s Excellence in Research Award for her exhibition and publication HIDE: Skin as Material and Metaphor (2010). She served on the boards of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective (2007-2012), the American Indian Community House (2005-2007), and is currently the president of the Native American Art Studies Association (2011-2015). She was the curator and co-director of the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City from 2000–2005. A member of the Navajo Nation, she earned her master of arts from the University of New Mexico in Native American art history.

Chief Curator / Curator of Art After 1945

Rene Paul Barilleaux

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Institution

McNay Art Museum

Title

Chief Curator / Curator of Art After 1945

René Paul Barilleaux (American, born Lafayette, Louisiana) is Chief Curator/Curator of Art after 1945 at the McNay Art Museum. One of three top-tier managers, Barilleaux works with the Director to provide overall artistic vision, supervises five senior staff, and oversees a budget of approximately 2.7 million. Since joining the McNay in 2005, he has greatly expanded the postwar and contemporary art collection in range and number, while developing new collecting areas including photo-based work and installation art. He organized solo presentations by Lynda Benglis, Judith Godwin, Jane Hammond, Joseph Marioni, and Sandy Skoglund, as well as American Art Since 1945: In a New Light, New Image Sculpture, Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune, and Beauty Reigns: A Baroque Sensibility in Recent Painting. He initiated new exhibition programs including a video series, and has edited and contributed to numerous publications including the Whitney Museum’s recent Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE. Barilleaux currently serves on the McNay’s master planning committee. Working in museums for nearly 35 years, he held curatorial positions at the Mississippi Museum of Art; College of Charleston, South Carolina; Madison Art Center, Wisconsin; and Museum of Holography, New York. Barilleaux received a BFA from The University of Southwestern Louisiana and an MFA from Pratt Institute.

Curator and Museum Director

Gudrun Buehl

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Gudrun Bühl serves as the museum director and curator of the Byzantine Collection at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. Since joining Dumbarton Oaks in 2004, she has directed the re-installation of the galleries and launched an ongoing series of experimental and experiential special exhibitions. She was assistant curator at the Bode Museum and lectured on Byzantine Art at the University of Göttingen and the Freie Universität Berlin. Gudrun received her art history Ph.D. from Freiburg University and published her first book on personifications of cities, especially Roma and Constantinopolis. She has edited several volumes and published numerous articles and reviews in journals, focusing on Byzantine works of ivory. After a major redesign of the museum she has edited the volume “Dumbarton Oaks - The Collections” introducing selected artworks to a broader public. Gudrun is currently supervising an online scholarly catalogue research project to publish the Byzantine textile holding and is working on a loan exhibition devoted to Byzantine and early Islamic textiles and the concepts of pre-modern ‘interior design’.

Curator of Modern Art

Carol Eliel

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Institution

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Title

Curator of Modern Art

Carol S. Eliel is LACMA’s curator of modern art. With the museum since 1984, she has organized numerous exhibitions with catalogues including Helen Pashgian: Light Invisibleand John Altoon (both 2014); David Smith: Cubes and Anarchy (2011); Lee Mullican: An Abundant Harvest of Sun (2005); L’Esprit Nouveau: Purism in Paris, 1918-1925 (2001); Mariko Mori(1998); Annette Messager (1995); and The Apocalyptic Landscapes of Ludwig Meidner (1989). Eliel is currently coorganizing (with the Guggenheim and the Art Institute) a Moholy-Nagy retrospective, opening in 2016. She is actively involved with acquisitions, recently including works by Judy Chicago, Bruce Conner, László Moholy-Nagy, and Simmons & Burke.

Eliel has lectured across the US and written on subjects ranging from eighteenth-century French painting to cutting-edge contemporary art. From 2011-13 she was President of the Association of Art Museum Curators. In 1999 the French government named her Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Eliel received her B.A. from Yale and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU.

Co-Director

Anne Goodyear

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Institution

Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Title

Co-Director

Anne Collins Goodyear, Ph.D. is Co-Director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art and Past President of the College Art Association. She is former Curator of Prints and Drawings at the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, where she became the first curator to collect digital and time-based art. Goodyear has curated numerous exhibitions and published and lectured widely about modern and contemporary American art and portraiture. Her essays have appeared in several scholarly journals, which include American Art and Leonardo, and in edited volumes and exhibition catalogues such as Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff (2014), R. Luke DuBois—Now (2014), The Network: Portrait Conversations (2012); The Political Economy of Art: Creating the Modern Nation of Culture (2008), Cold War Modern: Art and Design in a Divided World (2008), and Photography Theory(2007). She is co-editor, with Margaret Weitekamp, Artefacts: Studies in the History of Science and Technology Volume 9: Analyzing Art and Aesthetics(Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013), and is co-editor, with James W. McManus, AKA Marcel Duchamp: Meditations on the Identities of an Artist (forthcoming from the Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press). She and McManus also co-edited Inventing Marcel Duchamp: The Dynamics of Portraiture (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, and Washington, DC: National Portrait Gallery, 2009).

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Toby Kamps

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Institution

The Menil Collection

Title

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Toby Kamps, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Menil Collection, Houston, has organized solo exhibitions by artists such as Claes Oldenburg, Ellsworth Kelly, Vanessa Beecroft, Danny Lyon, and Wols (Wolfgang Schulze), as well as thematic surveys including Silence, The Old, Weird America, Small World: Dioramas in Contemporary Art, and, with a curatorial team, Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art. His previous positions include Curator and Department Head, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; Director, Institute of Contemporary Art, Maine College of Art, Portland; and Senior Curator, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. A graduate of Bowdoin College, the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art, and the Getty Museum Leadership Institute, Kamps has written on contemporary art and artists for numerous exhibition catalogues and magazines.

Curator of Photography

Corey Keller

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Institution

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)

Title

Curator of Photography

Corey Keller is curator of photography at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where she has organized a number of major exhibitions, including Brought to Light: Photography and the Invisible, 1840–1900 (2008), which explored the use of photography in nineteenth-century science, and the traveling retrospective, Francesca Woodman (2011). Since 2003, Keller has overseen Picturing Modernity, SFMOMA’s ongoing presentation of its photography collection, and is currently preparing a large-scale collection installation, About Time, for the museum’s re-opening in 2016. In addition to authoring several SFMOMA publications, Keller has contributed essays on Eadweard Muybridge, Carleton Watkins, and Jay DeFeo. In 2010 she conceived the symposium “Is Photography Over?” and participated as a panelist. She is working on the first survey of the 19th-century photographer J.B. Greene, and is co-organizing an exhibition on Man Ray.

Previously, Keller held curatorial positions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She received her A.M. in art history from Stanford, where she was a doctoral candidate (ABD), and holds a BA in American Studies from Yale.

Curator and Head of the Department of French Paintings

Mary Morton

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Institution

National Gallery of Art

Title

Curator and Head of the Department of French Paintings

Mary Morton is curator and head of the French paintings department at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. She received her bachelor’s degree from Stanford University in history, and her PhD from Brown University, concentrating on 19th and early 20th century European painting. Dr. Morton began her curatorial career in the European art department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and spent five years as associate curator of paintings at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Her exhibition projects include The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme (2010); Sur le Motif: Painting in Nature around 1800 (2008); Oudry's Painted Menagerie (2007); Courbet and the Modern Landscape (2006); Focus on the Beck Collection: André Derain's "The Turning Road, L'Estaque" (2002); Paris in the Age of Impressionism: Masterworks from the Musée d'Orsay (2002) and Old Masters, Impressionists, and Moderns: French Masterworks from the State Pushkin Museum, Moscow (2002). At the National Gallery, she organized the installation of Gauguin: Maker of Myth (2011), and in January 2012, a reinstallation of the Gallery’s renowned nineteenth century collection. She is currently working on an exhibition of the work of Gustave Caillebotte for 2015, and of Hubert Robert for 2016.

Curator of 17th Century Dutch Painting

Pieter Roelofs

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Institution

Rijksmuseum

Title

Curator of 17th Century Dutch Painting

Pieter Roelofs is curator of 17th century Dutch painting at the Rijksmuseum since 2006. Among the exhibition projects he is currently involved in are Asia in Amsterdam (2015, with Peabody Essex Museum, Salem) andHercules Segers(2016, with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York). One of the research projects he is co-supervising is the Thread Count Automation Project on the Utrecht Caravaggisti. Roelofs participated in the project team refurbishing the 17th century Dutch galleries at the newly reopened Rijksmuseum and curated a variety of exhibitions, including The Limbourg Brothers: Nijmegen Masters at the French Court (1400-1416)(2005, Museum Het Valkhof, Nijmegen), Hendrick Avercamp: Master of the Ice scene (2009, with the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC), Gabriel Metsu (2010, with the National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin / NGA, Washington DC) and Rembrandt, Claudius Civilis (2014). He has published and lectured on a wide range of art historical themes, from the Middle Ages up to the 20th century.

Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator

Xavier Salomon

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Institution

The Frick Collection

Title

Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator

Xavier F. Salomon was born in Rome and grew up between Italy and England. He was educated at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, where he received his BA in art history, his MA and PhD, with a thesis on ‘The Religious Artistic and Architectural Patronage of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini (1571-1621)’. His main areas of expertise are art and patronage in 17th-century Rome, and the painter Paolo Veronese. He has worked in curatorial capacities at The British Museum, the National Gallery and Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, and at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He is currently Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator at The Frick Collection, New York.

Curator of Decorative Arts and Design

Sarah Schleuning

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Institution

High Museum of Art

Title

Curator of Decorative Arts and Design

Sarah Schleuning is curator of decorative arts and design at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia. Her previous positions include curator and head of the fellowship program at The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami Beach, Florida and assistant curator at Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Schleuning holds an M.A. in the history of decorative arts from Parsons School of Design/Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, and a B.A. from Cornell University.

Schleuning has curated several exhibitions relating to modern decorative arts and contemporary design including Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas, Joris Laarman: Design in the Digital Age, and Fashioning the Modern French Interior. Her most recent publications include Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas, Moderne: Fashioning the French Interior and Weapons of Mass Dissemination: The Propaganda of War.