Participants from CCL Mellon Foundation Seminar 2014

Katie Apsey

Katie Apsey

University of Wisconsin

Mentor: JAY SANDERS, Curator of Performing Arts, Whitney Museum of American Art

Katie Apsey is an Art History Ph.D. student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and holds an MA in Art History from Concordia University in Montréal. Her research focuses on Contemporary Native American performance art, dance, and staged demonstrations as they relate to consumption, cosmopolitanisms, and spectatorship. Before returning to graduate work, Katie worked for many years at the Brooklyn Museum of Art as curatorial assistant for the Asian, African, and Islamic Art collections and also organized film, music and performance programming for the museum’s “First Saturdays” programs while working in the museum’s education department. Katie will also be taking part in the Smithsonian’s Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology this year working with the National Museum of Natural History’s collections. In addition to her curatorial interests, Katie is also a Contemporary dancer and performs with the Li Chiao- Ping Dance company.

Claire Brandon

Claire Brandon

New York University, Institute of Fine Arts

Mentor: NICHOLAS CULLINAN, Curator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Claire Brandon is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. She specializes in modern and contemporary art, and she is currently nearing the completion of her dissertation, “Spaces of Art in the Exhibition Age: A Source of Urban Transformation in Italy, 1970-2015.” She is the recipient of several awards, most recently the Global Research Institute Fellowship at NYU (2014-2015), the Gladys Krieble Delmas Grant for Research in the Veneto (2013-2014), and the Mellon Digital Tools Workshop Grant at NYU (2013). In 2008, Claire graduated magna cum laude from Bryn Mawr College, where she studied abroad at Université d’Aix-Marseille III, wrote her thesis on Sophie Calle’s Prenez Soin de Vous (2007), and received the Elinor Nahm prize in Italian Language and Literature. She has held internships at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection (2007) and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (2009). In 2010, she co-founded the Colloquium for Modern and Contemporary Art from the Middle East and South Asia at the Institute of Fine Arts. She served as editorial and research assistant in Bice Curiger, ed. Illuminations/Illuminazioni: Biennale Arte 2011 (Venice: Marsilio Editori, 2011). She was an essayist in Sarah Urist Green, ed. Graphite (Indianapolis Museum of Art, April 2013). In 2014, she was a participant in the inaugural Center for Curatorial Leadership/Mellon Foundation Seminar in New York. Claire organized and participated in a conference entitled “The Contemporary Museum in Italy Since 1990” in October 2014 at NYU’s Villa La Pietra in Florence, which brought together curators, art historians, museum officials, architects, and cultural policy officials to discuss many of the issues facing Italian museums today. Claire is currently a research assistant for an exhibition on William Copley’s work opening at the Menil Collection in 2016.

Ashley Dunn

Ashley Dunn

Northwestern University

Mentor: REBECCA RABINOW (CCL '13), Leonard A. Lauder Curator of Modern Art and the Curator-in-Charge of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Ashley E. Dunn is a Ph.D. candidate in art history at Northwestern University focusing on 19th-century French visual culture with a particular interest in print media. Her most recent museum experience includes an internship in the Department of Prints & Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago and a graduate fellowship at Northwestern’s Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art. Born in Canada and raised in Bermuda, Ashley received her Bachelor’s degree summa cum laude in French from Emory University. An internship at the Musée d’Art Américain in Giverny first sparked her interest in curatorial work and she gained subsequent experience at the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Archives of American Art, and International Arts & Artists in Washington, D.C., before completing a Master’s with distinction in history of art and visual culture at the University of Oxford. This fall, Ashley will begin research in Paris for her dissertation “Graphic Paris: A Study of Urban Etching, 1850-1880.”

Anne Feng

Anne Feng

University of Chicago

Mentor: MAXWELL K. HEARN (CCL '09), Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Anne Feng is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago. Her research interests include religious murals, Pure Land Buddhism, Dunhuang art, and Japanese Buddhist painting. She received her BA with Honors from New York University in 2010, with a thesis on the 12th century Ten Kings of Hell paintings from Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2008, Anne interned at the Palace Museum in Beijing, and worked for exhibitions on Qing dynasty court culture. From 2008-09, she worked as a research intern at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for the Special Collection “The World of Kublai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty”. At the University of Chicago, she has organized the Contemporary Chinese Art Yearbook and the Xiangtangshan Digital Caves Project for the Center for the Art of East Asia. She is also the coordinator for the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia workshop at the University.

Daria Rose Foner

Daria Rose Foner

Columbia University

Mentor: ANDREA BAYER (CCL '12), Jayne Wrightsman Curator, Department of European Paintings, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Daria Rose Foner is entering her third year as a doctoral candidate at Columbia University, where she focuses on Italian Renaissance painting and sculpture. She received her B.A. from Princeton University in 2011, where her senior thesis, “Suzy Frelinghuysen: Cubist Painter and Classical Performer,” was awarded the Grace May Tilton Senior Thesis Prize. In 2012 she earned her M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge. For her master’s thesis on depictions of Saint Catherine of Alexandria in Renaissance Italy, she received a Brancusi Travel Award from Kettle’s Yard to conduct research in Venice and Rome. Daria has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Uffizi Gallery, and the Marianne Boesky Gallery and has volunteered at the Fitzwilliam Museum. Last fall she co- organized the exhibition, “Goddess, Heroine, Beast: Anna Hyatt Huntington’s New York Sculpture, 1902-1936” at Columbia’s Wallach Gallery. Prior to attending Princeton, Daria danced as a member of the Norwegian National Ballet.

Kimberli Gant

Kimberli Gant

University of Texas, Austin

Mentor: EVA RESPINI (CCL '14), Barbara Lee Chief Curator, The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston

Kimberli Gant is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Texas Austin pursuing research on photographic depictions of Lagos, Nigeria since 1960. She is the Graduate Research Coordinator for UT’s Center for the Art of Africa & Its Diasporas (CAAD) and was the 2012 inaugural Curatorial Fellow at The Contemporary Austin. Prior to her graduate work, Kimberli was the Curator of Exhibitions and Public Programs at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art (MoCADA) in Brooklyn, New York where she curated exhibitions focused on contemporary artists of African Diaspora. Kimberli has also published articles in Art Lies and African Arts and written catalogues essays for The Contemporary Austin, the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Centre for Contemporary Art Lagos.

Carolyn Laferrière

Carolyn Laferrière

Yale University

Mentor: C. GRIFFITH MANN (CCL '11), Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Carolyn Laferrière is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art Department at Yale University. Carolyn completed a B.A. magna cum laude from Carleton University in Art History, Classics, and Religious Studies, and an M.A. in Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of British Columbia. She acted as curatorial assistant for an exhibit on 18th-century French gouache paintings at the National Gallery of Canada, and as a research assistant in the Ancient Art Department at Yale University Art Gallery. She has also undertaken research at the American School for Classical Studies at Athens. Her dissertation, entitled “The Complex Sensations of Divine Music in Archaic and Classical Greek Art,” argues that classical Athenian cult practice used the visual arts and music together as media for visualizing sound, so that vase painting and relief sculpture from that period employed both media to create epiphanies of divine presence.

Perrin Lathrop

Perrin Lathrop

Princeton University

Mentor: JUDY HECKER, Assistant Curator, Department of Prints & Drawings, The Museum of Modern Art

Perrin Lathrop is a doctoral student in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University. She graduated summa cum laude with honors in Art History and Business Studies from New York University in 2009 and received her MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London in 2011. Before coming to Princeton, Ms. Lathrop worked as Curatorial Associate, Arts of Africa at the Newark Museum, New Jersey, where she solidified her commitment to the study of African Art. She has published her research in the Savvy Journal of contemporary African art and presented papers at conferences at Boston University, Rutgers University and the University of South Africa. In 2013 she curated the New York Times-reviewed exhibition The Art of Translation: The Simon Ottenberg Gift of Modern and Contemporary Nigerian Art. At Princeton, she plans to expand her research into the development of modernism on the African continent.

Julia McHugh

Julia McHugh

University of California, Los Angeles

Mentor: RONDA KASL, Curator of Colonial Latin American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Julia McHugh is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has a B.A. in Art History from Grinnell College. Her dissertation, “Dressing Spaces in Eighteenth-Century Peru: Basilio Pacheco’s Life of Saint Augustine Series,” examines the influence of locally produced textiles on indigenous painting guilds in the Andes. Her research focuses on the Cusco School of Painting, indigenous strategies of representation, and the use of cloth in the construction of pictorial and lived space in the colonial Andes. She has assisted with curatorial projects at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Getty Research Institute.

Natalie Musteata

Natalie Musteata

The Graduate Center, CUNY

Mentor: CARLOS BASUALDO, Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Curator of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Natalie Musteata is a Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, CUNY, where she is completing her dissertation on the post-war history of artist-curated exhibitions. At The New School, she teaches Art in the XXI Century, Art into Action: Socially-Engaged Practices in the 20th Century, and Performance and Participation in the 20th Century. She has organized conferences and presented papers internationally on the subjects of exhibition history and the intersection of art and politics for such institutions as Centre Georges Pompidou, The Vera List Center for Art & Politics, College Art Association, and The Center for the Humanities, The Graduate Center. She writes regularly for artforum.com, Performa Magazine, and Art21, and is the curator of several exhibitions of socially engaged art, including UNREST: Revolt against Reason, apexart, 2012, and if I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution, Haverford College, 2014.

Stephanie Pearson

Stephanie Pearson

University of California, Berkeley

Mentor: MELANIE HOLCOMB (CCL '14), Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A Ph.D. student in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, Stephanie Pearson is currently completing her dissertation while living in Berlin and working at the Pergamon Museum. For this museum and the other branches of Berlin’s Antikensammlung, Stephanie writes and translates texts for both the permanent collections and major international exhibitions. She has conducted fieldwork around the Mediterranean for the past seven years — most importantly at Pompeii — including excavation, digital mapping, and 3-D topographical survey. The wall painting in Pompeian houses and other sites across the ancient Mediterranean constitute the focus of her research. Alongside her own studies, Stephanie has also led student advocacy groups in art history and archaeology and regularly organizes colloquia for the Archaeological Institute of America.

Katherine Rochester

Katherine Rochester

Bryn Mawr College

Mentor: VIVIEN GREENE, Senior Curator, 19th- and Early 20th-Century Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Katherine is a fourth year Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art at Bryn Mawr College, with interests in German Romanticism, twentieth- century European Modernism, Contemporary art, and film. Her dissertation explores the history of early experimental animation, focusing on the work of Lotte Reiniger in Weimar Berlin. Katherine has worked at the Walker Art Center, The Soap Factory, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. From 2011-2013 she was the Curatorial Research Assistant for Jason Rhoades, Four Roads at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia. Katherine sits on the Curatorial Committee for the artist-in-residence Program at Eastern State Penitentiary and is a critic at the Philadelphia Weekly and Artforum. She recently presented papers at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies and the Institute of Fine Arts. In the fall, she will begin a yearlong fellowship at the Center for Advanced German and European Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin.

Akili Tommasino

Akili Tommasino

Harvard University

Mentors: LEAH DICKERMAN (CCL '12), Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art; ANNE UMLAND, Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art

Akili Tommasino is a doctoral candidate (ABD) in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University, where he earned his BA and MA. A scholar of twentieth-century avant-garde art and advocate of emerging artists, Tommasino has curated exhibitions in the United States and Europe. Most recently a Fulbright Fellow at the Centre Pompidou – Musée National d’Art Moderne in Paris where he interned in 2012, he has held internships at the Harvard Art Museums/ Fogg Museum, Venice Biennale International Art Exhibition, National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. His dissertation, in progress, “Machine Envy: Fernand Léger and the Machine Aesthetic 1909-1955,” examines the efforts of the French artist to produce historically relevant and socially transformative art through a variety of media during an age violently impacted by the advent of machine technology.

John Tyson

John Tyson

Emory University

Mentor: MASSIMILIANO GIONI, Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions, New Museum

John A. Tyson is a Ph.D. candidate at Emory University; he holds an MA from Tufts University. Focusing on modern and contemporary art history, John is presently working on a dissertation on the artwork of Hans Haacke (“Hans Haacke: Beyond Systems Aesthetics”). He is additionally interested in African art and art of the African diaspora and presented a paper analyzing Alain Locke’s vision of black art at the 2014 CAA conference. In 2011-2012 John was a Helena Rubinstein Fellow of Critical Studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program. He will be the recipient of a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art during 2014-2015. Committed to education, he was teaching fellow at Harvard University in 2008. John has taught courses on the history of African art, twentieth century art, and the survey of art history at St. John’s University, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and St. Francis College.

Kjell Wangensteen

Kjell Wangensteen

Princeton University

Mentor: XAVIER SALOMON (CCL '15), Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, The Frick Collection

Kjell Wangensteen is a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton University studying Northern Baroque art. His dissertation, "Hyperborean Baroque: Sweden and the European Landscape Tradition, 1644-1718," focuses on the artistic milieu of Sweden's so-called "Era of Greatness." He is a recipient of the Theodore Rousseau Fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has held positions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. He received his B.A. with honors in art history from Yale College, an M.B.A. from the Yale School of Management, and an M.A. from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art.

Robert Wiesenberger

Robert Wiesenberger

Columbia University

Mentor: BRETT LITTMAN, Executive Director, The Drawing Center

Robert Wiesenberger is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Columbia University and a Critic at the Yale School of Art, where he teaches in the MFA program in Graphic Design. He specializes in modern and contemporary architecture, design and media, with a special interest in prewar Germany and postwar America. With graphic designer David Reinfurt he recently organized the exhibition “Messages and Means: Muriel Cooper at MIT” at the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery in New York, a catalog for which is forthcoming from the MIT Press with support from the Graham Foundation. Robert holds a B.A. with honors from the University of Chicago and has worked at the design firms MetaDesign and Ammunition, and as a curatorial intern in the Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA. He is a contributor to 032c and ART PAPERS.