Participants from CCL Mellon Foundation Seminar 2015

Andrea Achi

Andrea Achi

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

Mentor: MELANIE HOLCOMB (CCL '14), Curator, Department of Medieval Art & The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Andrea Myers Achi is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She specializes in late antique and Byzantine art, manuscript studies, and late Roman ceramics. She received her bachelor’s degree in ancient studies from Barnard College, and she holds two masters’ degrees from New York University: one in Ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian studies and a second in the History of Art from the Institute of Fine Arts. Andrea’s dissertation investigates monastic books and book production from the medieval Monastery of St. Michael in Egypt. The project investigates Coptic manuscripts at the Pierpont Morgan Library and examines how manuscripts can help us understand monastic economy, including the production of books, and the pervasive monastic book culture of Christian Egypt. In addition to her art historical research, Andrea is a professional archaeological ceramicist and has been involved with numerous excavations in Egypt and Italy.

Jamin An

Jamin An

University of California, Los Angeles

Mentor: LAURA HOPTMAN, Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art

Jamin An is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He specializes in contemporary art with additional interests in medieval and Byzantine art history. His dissertation, “Tracing the Emergence of Contemporary Curatorial Practice, 1964–1976,” examines the historical transformation of the curator through the art practices of the 1960s and 1970s, the expansion of the art market, and the conditions of the post-industrial city. Jamin holds a B.A. with High Distinction in Studio Art and Political and Social Thought from the University of Virginia. He has worked at the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Glenstone, and the Getty Research Institute and is currently the Yvonne & Harry Lenart Graduate Fellow in the Department of Modern Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Daniella Berman

Daniella Berman

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

Mentor: JUDITH DOLKART (CCL '13), The Mary Stripp & R. Crosby Kemper Director, Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy

Daniella Berman is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, specializing in French art of the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. Her dissertation considers the unfinished—as fact and aesthetic—during the Revolutionary era in France. Ms. Berman holds a B.A. from Yale University in the History of Art and Italian Studies, and an M.A. in the History of Art from the IFA. Prior to her graduate work, she served as the Bartels Fellow at the Yale Center for British Art, and worked at the Yale University Art Gallery, Yale University Press, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Her M.A. thesis explored the relationship between religion and print culture in French eighteenth century; other research interests include the dialogues that exist among the arts, particularly between visual artand music, and the role of translation between media and languages. She has presented at various conferences, most recently at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and for the Mellon Research Initiative at the IFA, and has contributed to several publications.

Emilie Boone

Emilie Boone

Northwestern University

Mentor: CHRISTA CLARKE (CCL '12), Curator, Arts of Africa, and Senior Curator, Arts of Africa and the Americas, The Newark Museum

Emilie C. Boone is a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University, with interests in photography, the art of the African Diaspora, and American art. She completed a B.A. in English at Amherst College and an M.A. in Art History at Washington University in St. Louis. As a current Fellow at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Emilie is completing her dissertation on the early twentieth century studio photographs of James Van Der Zee. She has served as a Fulbright Fellow at the Notman Photographic Archives in Montreal, a Dangler Curatorial Fellow at the Art Institute of Chicago, and a Research Associate at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. Emilie has also written for History of Photography and African Arts and has a forthcoming essay in the exhibition catalog “From Within and Without: The History of Haitian Photography.”

Rachel Boyd

Rachel Boyd

Columbia University

Mentor: STEPHAN WOLOHOJIAN (CCL '10), Curator, Department of European Paintings, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Rachel Boyd is a Ph.D. candidate in the Art History Department at Columbia University. She earned her B.A. in the history of art and Italian literature from Yale University in 2009. She went on to study for her M.Phil. in the history of art at the University of Cambridge, where she held a Gates Cambridge Scholarship. Rachel is currently at work on her dissertation; her research examines the three-generation workshop of the Della Robbia family, who invented and quickly became synonymous with a form of sculpture – tin-glazed terracotta – that even today remains instantly recognizable to art historians and non-specialists alike. While her primary field of study is Renaissance art and architecture, she maintains active research interests in nineteenth-century art and historiography and in the material culture of the ancient world. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery and the Frick Collection, and this summer will work at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to contribute research for a 2016 exhibition on the Della Robbia. In September 2015, she will take up a two-year Kress Institutional Fellowship at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, Italy.

Yve Chavez

Yve Chavez

University of California, Los Angeles

Mentor: RONDA KASL, Curator, Colonial Latin American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Yve Chavez is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Art History at UCLA. She received her B.A. in Art History with a minor in Native American Studies from Stanford University. Her M.A. degree is from the University of Washington where she wrote her thesis on southern California Indian basket weaving traditions. Yve’s dissertation, “Indigenous Artists and Ingenuity at the California Missions After 1769” will expand upon her master’s research and provide a Native American perspective on the art of the California missions. Yve is the president of UCLA’s American Indian Graduate Student Association and an active member of the San Gabriel Mission Museum Board. Currently, she works as a research assistant at the Getty Research Institute. She has interned at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Getty Villa, the National Museum of the American Indian, and the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Sara E. Cole

Sara E. Cole

Yale University

Mentors: C. GRIFFITH MANN (CCL '10), Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; DIANA PATCH, Lila Acheson Wallace Curator-in-Charge, Department of Egyptian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sara E. Cole is a PhD candidate in Ancient History at Yale University specializing in the visual and material culture of Graeco-Roman Egypt. Her research explores processes of cross-cultural exchange and hybridization in antiquity and their manifestations in the art historical and archaeological records. She is currently writing her dissertation, “Graeco-Egyptian Hybridization in Ptolemaic Egypt (ca. 323 – 30 BC): Visual Culture and Elite Identity.” Sara has served as a curatorial intern at the William King Museum in Abingdon, VA, the Frank H. McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the Ancient Art Department of the Yale University Art Gallery. While at the YUAG, she curated an installation of late antique and early medieval art, the 2014 loan exhibition “Glass of the Ancient Mediterranean” for the McClung Museum, and an upcoming exhibition of ancient glass at Yale (date and title TBD). She has excavated at several archaeological sites in Egypt and is currently a member of the Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit Archaeological Project in the western Delta.

Rachel Kreiter

Rachel Kreiter

Emory University

Mentors: ALISA LAGAMMA (CCL '10), Michael E. Pulitzer Curator in Charge, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; YEKATERINA BARBASH, Associate Curator, Arts of Ancient Egypt, The Brooklyn Museum

A doctoral candidate in art history at Emory University, R. Kreiter studies the visual culture of ancient Egypt and the use of Egyptian art in the west after antiquity. Recently, Kreiter completed a 2014-15 Andrew W. Mellon Graduate Teaching Fellowship at Spelman College and coordinated an Egyptian section for the Michael C. Carlos Museum’s presentation of African Cosmos: Stellar Arts, which runs through June 2015. Other interests include appropriation and participatory culture. She lives in Chicago.

Craig Lee

Craig Lee

University of Delaware

Mentor: MARTINO STIERLI, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art

Craig Lee focuses on the history of modern architecture and design. He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Delaware. His dissertation is an architectural history of commercial signage in twentieth-century America. A secondary area of research investigates modern architecture in South Africa. His work has been recognized with support from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Getty Research Institute, Duke University, and Hagley Museum and Library, among others. Craig has completed internships at the Princeton University Art Museum, National Gallery of Art, Fallingwater, Museum of Modern Art, Hood Museum of Art, and Art Institute of Chicago. He received an MA from the Bard Graduate Center and a BA from Dartmouth College.

Sydney Skelton Simon

Sydney Skelton Simon

Stanford University

Mentors: LEAH DICKERMAN (CCL '12), Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art; CARA MCCARTY, Curatorial Director, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Sydney Skelton Simon is a doctoral candidate in Art History at Stanford University, specializing in post-World War II American art and design. Her dissertation explores the nexus of art, design, science, and corporate culture in Cold War America through the career and oeuvre of the Italian-American artist Harry Bertoia (1915-1978). Simon holds a B.A. in Art History from Yale University. As an undergraduate, she co-curated two exhibitions at the Yale University Art Gallery and held summer internships at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art and at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. From 2007-2011, she worked as a curatorial assistant in Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Most recently, she was the first curatorial intern for the Anderson Collection at Stanford University, writing wall text and assisting with the layout of the inaugural installation of the newest museum on campus.

Phil Taylor

Phil Taylor

Princeton University

Mentor: ANNE UMLAND, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art

Phil Taylor is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University, and the David E. Finley Fellow, 2014-2017 at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His dissertation, “Raoul Ubac’s Photographic Surrealism,” positions the artist as a figure through which to develop new perspectives on the position of avant-garde photography in the 1930s, on surrealism and photography’s role within it, and on the relationship of the avant-garde to the tumultuous politics of the time. Phil is the primary author of Various Small Books: Referencing Various Small Books by Ed Ruscha (M.I.T. Press, 2013). Prior to coming to Princeton, Phil organized an exhibition of modernist photography, Of the Refrain, at Robert Mann Gallery in New York in 2008. As a critic, he is a frequent contributor to artforum.com.

Stephanie Tung

Stephanie Tung

Princeton University

Mentors: MIA FINEMAN, Curator of Photography, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; ALEXANDRA MUNROE, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Stephanie H. Tung is a Ph.D. Candidate at Princeton University. She specializes in Chinese art history, with a particular interest in modern and contemporary photography. She holds a Bachelor’s degree from Harvard, where her honors thesis examined the relationship between text and image in New York City graffiti of the 1970s and 1980s. Prior to graduate school, she worked as a translator and curator for the Three Shadows Photography Art Centre in Beijing, where she organized exhibitions including WATW, Weare the World: Photography from China and the Netherlands (2010) and Ai Weiwei: New York 1983-1993 (2010). Most recently, she completed a Fulbright Fellowship at Fudan University in Shanghai, conducting fieldwork for her dissertation on Republican era photography. Stephanie is a contributing author to the Aperture publication, The Chinese Photobook (2015) and is currently editing a volume of Ai Weiwei’s Beijing photography, 1993-2003.

Emily Warner

Emily Warner

University of Pennsylvania

Mentors: BETSY KORNHAUSER, Curator in The American Wing, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; TERRY CARBONE, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of American Art and Managing Curator, Arts of the Americas, The Brooklyn Museum

Emily Warner is a historian of American and Modern art, currently pursuing a doctorate in Art History at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research revolves around the history of abstract murals in the New Deal and early Cold War decades. More generally, she is interested in how and for what purposes art has been claimed as “public,” and how its various sites—from specific buildings to galleries and museums—have contributed to such an understanding. She has worked in curatorial, conservation, and education departments at several museums, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she is currently the Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellow in the Modern and Contemporary Art Department. She is a recipient of the Herskovic Prize for Graduate Work on Abstract Expressionism, and of fellowships from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Luce / ACLS Foundation.

Elizabeth Williams

Elizabeth Williams

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

Mentor: HELEN EVANS, Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art, Department of Medieval Art. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Elizabeth Williams recently defended her dissertation at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. Her thesis explored attitudes towards adornment in the medieval eastern Mediterranean and included a catalogue of precious metal jewelry held in museums in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East. She worked as curatorial assistant in the Department of Medieval Art at the Metropolitan Museum for Pen and Parchment: Drawing in the Middle Ages (2009), and was a fellow in the Department of Islamic Art during Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition (2012), for which she co-edited the exhibition blog. Elizabeth is on the advisory board for Jerusalem in the Middle Ages, opening in 2016. She has taught at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and in the Department of Art History and the Office of the Dean at NYU. As a post-doctoral teaching fellow at Dumbarton Oaks, she coordinates a collaborative project on late antique and medieval Egyptian textiles and teaches courses at the George Washington University.

Orin Zahra

Orin Zahra

Washington University in Saint Louis

Mentors: MARY CLARE MCKINLEY, Assistant Curator, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; ALISON HOKANSON, Assistant Curator in the Department of European Paintings, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Orin Zahra is a doctoral student in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis. Having lived in Bangladesh and the Middle East prior to relocating to New York, she received her BA from the University of Maryland and MA from American University in Washington D.C. Her dissertation focuses on nineteenth and twentieth-century Impressionist practices in France, England, Germany, and the Ottoman Empire. She has secondary interests in South Asian visual cultures and has published in the peer-reviewed journal Modern Art Asia. Orin has held internships at the Phillips Collection, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. In 2014, she co-organized “Inside the Palace of Fine Arts: Cosmopolitanism at the 1904 World’s Fair” at Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum. Presently, she is co-chairing the committee for the forthcoming inaugural Graduate Student Art History Symposium titled “Endurance, Ephemerality: Art and the Passage of Time.”