Participants from CCL Class of 2016

Richard Aste

Richard Aste

Director

Richard Aste joined the Brooklyn Museum in 2010 as Curator of European Art. He was formerly Associate Curator of European Art at the Museo de Arte de Ponce in Puerto Rico. Today he oversees Brooklyn’s holdings of European painting, sculpture, and works on paper from the Middle Ages through 1945 as well as the renowned Spanish colonial collection. Aste was born in Lima, Peru, and raised in Miami. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan, his M.A. from Hunter College, and his Ph.D. from the CUNY Graduate Center. He has taught art history at Hunter College and worked as an Old Master Paintings and Drawings specialist at Christie’s New York and Rome and Wildenstein & Co. Among his curatorial credits are Giulio Romano: Master Designer (1999); Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home (2013); and Impressionism and the Caribbean: Francisco Oller and His Transatlantic World (2015).

Peter Barberie

Peter Barberie

The Brodsky Curator of Photographs

Peter Barberie is the Brodsky Curator of Photographs, Alfred Stieglitz Center, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His exhibition projects include Zoe Strauss: 10 Years (2012), a survey of the artist’s decade-long project to show her work in disused public spaces; and Paul Strand: Master of Modern Photography (2014), an in-depth retrospective of Strand’s pioneering career in photography and film. Previously, as the Museum’s Horace W. Goldsmith Curatorial Fellow, he organized the exhibition Looking at Atget (2005), and co-curated Dreaming in Black and White: Photography at the Julien Levy Gallery (2007). In 2008 he was guest curator at the Morgan Library and Museum for the exhibition Close Encounters: Irving Penn Portraits of Artists and Writers.

Mr. Barberie holds his B.A. in art history from the University of Connecticut, Storrs, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in the history of photography and modern art from Princeton University.

Caroline Campbell

Caroline Campbell

Head of the Curatorial Department and Curator of Italian Paintings Before 1500

Caroline Campbell is Head of the Curatorial Department and Curator of Italian Paintings before 1500 at the National Gallery, London. Earlier in her career, Caroline held curatorial positions at The Courtauld Gallery, London (where she was Curator of Paintings from 2005-12), the National Gallery and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

Born in Belfast, Caroline was educated at University College, Oxford and the Courtauld Institute of Art, London. Her interests encompass the interaction of Byzantine and Italian painting, Cranach, Cézanne and the twentieth century, but Italian Medieval and Renaissance painting and its reception are at the heart of her work as a curator and scholar. She has curated and co-curated many exhibitions, including Bellini and the East (2005-06), Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence (2009); Building the Picture: Architecture in Italian Renaissance Painting (2014) and Duccio/Caro: In Dialogue (2015).

Doryun Chong

Doryun Chong

Deputy Director and Chief Curator

Doryun Chong was appointed the inaugural Chief Curator at M+, Hong Kong in September 2013 and became Deputy Director and Chief Curator in January 2016. M+, a museum of 20th and 21st-century visual culture at the West Kowloon Cultural District, will open its Herzog and de Meuron-designed buidling in late 2019. At M+, He oversees all curatorial activities, including exhibitions and symposia, acquisitions for the collection, as well as learning and interpretation programs at M+. He is also a co-curator, with Stella Fong, of the one-person presentation of Tsang Kin-Wah at the Hong Kong pavilion in the 2015 Venice Biennale. Previously Chong was Associate Curator of Painting and Sculpture at MoMA, where he organized contemporary exhibitions and acquired works for the museum’s collection. At MoMA, he organized Bruce Nauman: Days (2010) and Projects 94: Henrik Olesen (2011), and Tokyo 1955-1970: A New Avant-Garde (2012), and co-edited From Postwar to Postmodern, Art in Japan, 1945-1989: Primary Documents (2013), the first anthology in English of critical documents in the histories of postwar Japanese art, design, and architecture.

Prior to his appointment at MoMA in 2009, Chong held various positions a curator in the Visual Arts department at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis from 2003 to 2009, and co-organized exhibitions including Haegue Yang: Integrity of the Insider (2009-10); Tetsumi Kudo: Garden of Metamorphosis (2008); Brave New Worlds (2007); and House of Oracles: A Huang Yong Ping Retrospective (2005), which traveled to Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing, among other venues. He has also curated or coordinated exhibitions at venues includingREDCAT, Los Angeles, the 2006 Busan Biennale, and the Korean Pavilion at the 2001 Venice Biennale, and his writings have appeared in journals such as Artforum, Afterall, The Exhibitionist, and Parkett, and museum and biennale publications by the Auckland Triennial, the Gwangju Biennale, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, and National Museum of Modern And Contemporary Art, Korea. Chong is the recipient of the first ICI Gerrit LansingIndependent Vision Award in 2010. He has served on numerous prize juries, including recently the 2015 Hugo Boss Prize, Absolut Art Award, and Contemporary Chinese Art Award.

Jay Clarke

Jay Clarke

Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

Jay A. Clarke is Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. From 1997 to 2009 she served as a curator in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago. Clarke has been a lecturer in the Graduate Program in the History of Art at Williams College since 2009. She is author of Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth (2009) and editor of Landscape, Innovation, and Nostalgia: The Manton Collection of British Art (2012); The Impressionist Line from Edgar Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec (2013); and Hurricanes Waves: Clifford Ross (2015). Clarke has curated exhibitions on a wide variety of artists from Albrecht Dürer to Pablo Picasso to Thomas Struth. She has published articles on Käthe Kollwitz, Max Beckmann, Edvard Munch, the art dealer and critic Julius Meier-Graefe, and the British linocut movement. Clarke received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Brown University.

Susan Fisher

Susan Fisher

Executive Director & Chief Curator

Susan Fisher is the Executive Director and Chief Curator at the Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation, the Greenwich Village historic townhouse and sculpture studio of American artist Chaim Gross (1904-91). She has previously served as the inaugural Horace W. Goldsmith Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Yale University Art Gallery and on the curatorial staff at the Guggenheim Museum. She was also a Theodore Rousseau Fellow in the European Paintings Department at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and a Whiting Fellow in the Humanities at Yale University. The curator and author of Picasso and the Allure of Language (Yale University Press, 2009) and over a dozen articles, she has taught modern art history and museum studies at Fairfield University and Yale University and has lectured nationally and internationally on 19th-century and modern art. She holds a PhD and MA from Yale University and a BA from Oberlin College.

Vera Grant

Vera Grant

Director

Vera Ingrid Grant is the director of the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art at the Hutchins Center, Harvard University. She most recently curated THE WOVEN ARC (Summer 2016); the Art of Jazz: NOTES (Spring 2016) at the Cooper Gallery; and The Persuasions of Montford at the Boston Center for the Arts (Spring 2015). Her curatorial approach leverages theories of visual culture to create an immersive exhibition experience charged with object driven dialogues. Grant is a Fulbright Scholar (University of Hamburg), has an MA in Modern European History from Stanford University, and is currently a fellow (2015-16) at the Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL). Her recent publications include: Luminós/C/ity.Ordinary Joy, as editor; and author of: “E2: Extraction/Exhibition Dynamics” (Harvard University Press, January 2015); “Visual Culture and the Occupation of the Rhineland,” The Image of the Black in Western Art, Vol. 5, The Twentieth Century, (Harvard University Press, February 2014); and “White Shame/Black Agency: Race as a Weapon in Post-World War I Diplomacy” in African Americans in American Foreign Policy, (University of Illinois Press, February 2014).

Randall Griffey

Randall Griffey

Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Randall R. Griffey is Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Prior to the Metropolitan, Griffey held curatorial positions at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (1999 – 2008) and the Mead Art Museum, Amherst College (2008 – 2012). At the Metropolitan, Griffey has organized Reimagining Modernism: 1900 – 1950, a comprehensive reinterpretation of the museum’s collections of European and American modern painting, sculpture, photography, works on paper, and design. He also co-curated Thomas Hart Benton’sAmerica Today Mural Rediscovered. Among his publications are the journal article “Marsden Hartley’s Aryanism: Eugenics in aFinnish‐Yankee Sauna,” in American Art (Smithsonian Institution) in 2008 and the essay “Reconsidering ‘The Soil’: The Stieglitz Circle, Regionalism, and Cultural Eugenics in the 1920s,” in the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties in 2011. Both of these publications were recognized with awards from the Association of Art Museum Curators.

Valerie Hillings

Valerie Hillings

Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project

Valerie Hillings, PhD, is Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. She leads the curatorial team responsible for building a collection of art made around the world since the 1960s and developing exhibitions and programming for the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi.

Since 2004, she has curated and co-curated exhibitions throughout the Guggenheim’s constellation of museums, among them Russia!; Hanne Darboven's Hommage à Picasso; Picturing America: Photorealism in the 1970s, and most recently ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s-60s. In addition, she has organized major presentations of works from the Guggenheim Museum’s collection for venues in Abu Dhabi, Australia, and Germany.

Hillings earned her BA in art history from Duke University and her MA and PhD in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

Theresa Papanikolas

Theresa Papanikolas

Curator of European and American Art

Theresa Papanikolas is Curator of European and American Art at the Honolulu Museum of Art. Through an innovative reinstallation of the permanent collection and the exhibitions From Whistler to Warhol: Modernism on Paper (2010); Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: The Hawaii Pictures (2013); and Art Deco Hawaii (2014), she has helped position the museum at the cultural hub of one of the country’s most diverse metropolitan areas.

From 2006 to 2008, Dr. Papanikolas was Wallis Annenberg Curatorial Fellow at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where she organized Doctrinal Nourishment: Art and Anarchism in the Time of James Ensor (2008) and helped plan Drawing Surrealism (2012). She has also held positions at Rice University, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, and has published widely on Dada and Surrealism. She holds degrees in Art History from USC (BA) and the University of Delaware (MA, PhD).

Daniel Schulman

Daniel Schulman

Director of Visual Art

Daniel Schulman is Director of Visual Art for the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, where he leads the city’s public art and exhibitions programs. He has worked at The Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was assistant and associate curator of modern and contemporary art from 1993 to 2004.

A specialist in African American art, Schulman curated and organized several major exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago and contributed actively to the museum’s acquisitions program. Most recently, he curated A Force for Change: African American Art and the Julius Rosenwald Fund (Spertus Museum, Chicago, 2009) and Richard Hunt: Sixty Years of Sculpture (Chicago Cultural Center, 2014). He is currently working on an exhibition devoted to the history of African American designers in Chicago. Schulman was educated at Columbia University in New York (BA 1982) and New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts (MA 1986).

Reto Thüring

Reto Thüring

Curator of Contemporary Art

Reto Thüring is curator of contemporary art at the Cleveland Museum of Art, where he is responsible for overseeing the museum’s collection of contemporary artwork and the programming of exhibitions at the museum and the Transformer Station. He studied at the University of Basel and wrote his dissertation on Venetian portraiture of the 16th century. Since 2004, Thüring’s primary focus has been working with contemporary art and artists as a curator, editor, and art critic. Recent projects at the Cleveland Museum of Art include installations and solo exhibitions with Julia Wachtel, Jennifer Bartlett, Martin Creed, Fred Wilson, Janet Cardiff, Damián Ortega, Roman Signer, Ragnar Kjartansson, and the group exhibition The Unicorn at Transformer Station. For 2016 Thüring is working on a comprehensive exhibition on the work of Albert Oehlen.