Jennifer Baez

Jennifer Baez

Jennifer Baez specializes in the arts and visual culture of the early modern Ibero-Atlantic and Afro-Caribbean world (c.1500-1800), with a focus on aesthetics and practices of Christianity in late colonial contexts. Her dissertation explores miracle-making and the engagement of collective memory in eighteenth-century Hispaniola. She examines a series of cycles painted for the Virgin of Altagracia of rural Higüey to identify intersections between Marian piety, artistic practice, and the development of creole origin stories during the age of the Hispanic Enlightenment. Jennifer received her MA in art history from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her thesis on the 1955 World’s Fair in Santo Domingo considered how the Trujillo regime fashioned national identity through a visual and performative program that (re)presented colonial architecture, natural space, and the laboring, racialized, and gendered body. As a Patricia Rose Doctoral Fellow at Florida State University, Jennifer taught the Arts of Africa and The Museum Object courses. She is a recipient of the International Dissertation Semester Research Fellowship from The Graduate School and the Mason Dissertation Research Award from the Department of Art History at FSU. Her research has also recently been funded by a generous Carl & Marilynn Thoma Foundation Travel Award.

Articles Related to Jennifer Baez

Seminar 2019 Composite Image

2019-06-10

CCL Announces 2019 CCL/Mellon Foundation Seminar Students

The Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL) is pleased to announce the sixteen art history doctoral students selected for the sixth annual CCL/Mellon Foundation Seminar in Curatorial Practice.  Joining from fifteen universities—six of which are sending a student to the program for the first time—this year’s cohort addresses a wide range ... Read More >