Board of Trustees

Agnes Gund

Agnes Gund

Co-Founder and Chair, CCL

President Emerita, Museum of Modern Art; Chair, MoMA PS1; Trustee, Cleveland Museum of Art

Agnes Gund is President Emerita of the Museum of Modern Art and Chair of its International Council. She is also Chair of MoMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center. Ms. Gund joined the MoMA Board in 1976 and served as its President from 1991 until 2002. She is the Founder and a Trustee of Studio in a School Association, a non-profit organization she established in 1977 in response to budget cuts that virtually eliminated arts classes from New York City public schools. In January 2012, Ms. Gund was appointed Member of the New York State Council on the Arts. A philanthropist and collector of modern and contemporary art, Ms. Gund is Chair of the Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission of New York City, and currently serves on the boards of Chess in the Schools, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, and Socrates Sculpture Park, among others. She is co-founder of the Center for Curatorial Leadership and an Honorary Trustee of the Independent Curators International as well as the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. A civic leader and staunch supporter of education, women’s issues and environmental concerns, among other causes, Ms Gund has served on the boards of such wide-ranging organizations as the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and the Fund for Public Schools. She earned a B.A. in History from Connecticut College and a M.A. in Art History from Harvard University. She has since received numerous honorary doctorate degrees, including honors from CUNY Graduate Center (2007) and Brown University (1996).

Ed Henry

Ed Henry

Treasurer

President and CEO, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

Ed Henry was appointed president and CEO of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in January 2009. The foundation supports grants programs in the performing arts, the environment, medical research and child well-being. The work of the foundation is supported by an endowment of approximately $1.8 billion. He also serves as president of several operating foundations, including the Duke Farms Foundation, which is focused on environmental stewardship, and the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, which operates a center for the study of Islamic arts and cultures and "Building Bridges," a related grants program.

Previously he was an associate dean at Columbia Business School and continues as an adjunct faculty member. He has held senior administrative positions with a number of nonprofit institutions and was a David Rockefeller fellow with the Partnership for New York City.

Henry earned a degree in economics from the University of Michigan and business from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Much earlier in life he was a dancer with the New York City-based companies of Dan Wagoner and Viola Farber, had the opportunity to perform throughout the United States and abroad, served in the Artists-in-Schools program, created work for a number of venues and participated as a peer reviewer for federal, state and local funding organizations.

Kimerly Rorschach

Kimerly Rorschach

Secretary

Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO, Seattle Art Museum

Kimerly Rorschach joined the Seattle Art Museum as the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO in November of 2012. Under her leadership, the museum’s operations, artistic and educational programs are thriving. She led SAM’s development of a three year strategic plan that builds on the achievements of SAM’s massive 2007 expansion, which resulted in three unique sites for SAM: downtown’s flagship Museum, the Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park, and the Olympic Sculpture Park located on the waterfront. During her tenure, the museum has organized major exhibitions and important acquisitions have been added to SAM’s global collection. Rorschach was also instrumental in organizing Miró: The Experience of Seeing, a collaboration with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, which was on view at SAM in spring of 2014 and now on tour in the U.S.

Prior to SAM, Rorschach served as the Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Under her direction, the Nasher Museum opened to the public in 2005 and quickly built a dynamic program focusing on modern and contemporary art and service to the university and broader community, and attained a reputation as a leading university art museum. Rorschach established the museum as the cornerstone for the arts at Duke. She chaired Duke's Council on the Arts, working to promote the arts as one of five priorities in the university's strategic plan.

In prior roles, Rorschach was the Dana Feitler Director of the University of Chicago's David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art for 10 years and has held curatorial positions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia.

Rorschach is a past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors. In addition, she is a Trustee with the American Federation of Arts, New York, and serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Curatorial Leadership (founded by Agnes Gund). She has edited and written for numerous catalogues, journals and news publications.

Rorschach was a Fulbright Scholar, holds a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University and earned a B.A. from Brandeis University.

Michael Margitich

Michael Margitich

Trustee At-Large

Former Senior Deputy Director of External Affairs, MoMA

Mike was the Senior Deputy Director of External Affairs at The Museum of Modern Art for seventeen years. In his role as Senior Deputy Director of External Affairs, he oversaw all activities of the Department of Development and Membership, the Department of Special Programming and Events, The Contemporary Arts Council, The Junior Associates, Exhibition Funding, Planned Giving, Marketing, Communications, Graphics, Visitor Services, Government Relations, and P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center. In addition to planning the reopening of the new Museum of Modern Art in November 2004, he oversaw the Museum's $900 million capital campaign.

Mike's fundraising career, which spans thirty five years also includes work on billion dollar campaigns at both Harvard University and Columbia University, along with consulting on the Prince Charles Royal Trust Restoration of Salisbury Cathedral and the New York Philharmonic's 150th anniversary campaign.

Since joining John Brown Limited in 2011, Mike has counseled numerous non-profit organizations. His clients include The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, WNET New York Public Media, New York City Center, and the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

Mike has lectured at various institutions such as Christie's and Columbia University as well as cultural institutions around the world. He serves on The Board of Visitors at Columbia University School of General Studies and The Playwrights Realm Board.

Marnie Pillsbury

Marnie Pillsbury

Trustee at-Large

Philanthropic Advisor to David Rockefeller

Marnie Pillsbury is Philanthropic Advisor to David Rockefeller and served as Executive Director of the David Rockefeller Fund from 1990 until 2014. She serves on the board of Rockefeller University, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, International Women’s Health Coalition, Pinkerton Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Leadership. She is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Council of the Museum of Modern Art.

A graduate of Wellesley College, Pillsbury received an M.B.A. from the New York University Stern School of Business in 1987.

Michelle Joan Wilkinson

Michelle Joan Wilkinson

Trustee At-Large

Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Ph.D. is a curator at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), where she works on projects related to contemporary black life. She is the co-curator of two inaugural exhibitions at the NMAAHC: A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond and A Century in the Making: Building the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Wilkinson is also developing the museum’s collections in architecture and design.

Prior to NMAAHC, spent six years as Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture. In that capacity, she curated over twenty exhibitions, including the critically-acclaimed A People’s Geography: The Spaces of African American Life, and two award-winning shows: For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People and Material Girls: Contemporary Black Women Artists.


Wilkinson holds a B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. from Emory University. From 1999-2002, she was an assistant professor of African American, Puerto Rican, and Caribbean literature at Bard College in New York. In 2002, Wilkinson entered the museum field seeking to fulfill her passion for the arts, writing, scholarly research, and public engagement. Since then, she has worked on exhibitions, publications, and public programs for the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and at the Studio Museum in Harlem, where she held the position of Editor and Library Coordinator.

Wilkinson’s research interests range from African American and African Diaspora cultural studies to global architecture and design. Wilkinson was a 2012 fellow of the Center for Curatorial Leadership in New York City, and completed a short-term residency at the Design Museum in London as part of her fellowship. Her honors and awards include fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in London. Her interdisciplinary research project, “V is for Veranda,” about architectural heritage in the Anglophone Caribbean, has been presented to international audiences in Suriname, England, India, and the United States.

Wilkinson is active on several boards and committees in the museum field. She is the editor of For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People and she has published critical essays in New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement and Potentially Harmful: The Art of American Censorship. Her writing also has appeared in the International Review of African American Art, ARC Magazine: Contemporary Caribbean Visual Art and Culture, Studio: The Studio Museum in Harlem Magazine, Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism, Black Issues Book Review, and Revue Noire: Art Contemporain Africain, among others.