Staff

Elizabeth Easton

Elizabeth Easton

Co-Founder and Director

Since 2007, Elizabeth Easton has been the Director of the Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL), a not-for-profit organization she co-founded with Agnes Gund to train museum curators in the fundamentals of management and leadership.

A distinguished curator, art historian and educator, she formulated the program for CCL as a direct result of her service as the first elected president of the Association of Art Museum Curators (2003-2006), an organization of more than 1200 curators from 350 museums across the United States. In her capacity as president, she launched an inquiry into the professional development of curators that led to the creation of CCL.

Easton earned her Ph.D. at Yale University, writing her dissertation on Edouard Vuillard's Interiors of the 1890's. She joined the Brooklyn Museum in 1988 as Assistant Curator, and was Chair of the Department of European Painting and Sculpture from 1999 until 2006. During her tenure, she was responsible for numerous exhibitions, including The Intimate Eye of Edouard Vuillard; Frederic Bazille: Prophet of Impressionism; Monet and the Mediterranean; Brooklyn Collects, among many others.

She has written books and numerous articles and essays for exhibition catalogues and a variety of art journals; she recently served as lead curator on the exhibition Snapshot: Painters and Photography from Bonnard to Vuillardthat opened at the Van Gogh Museum in 2011, and traveled to the Phillips Collection in Washington and the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012. Other recent scholarship has focused on original Impressionist frames. Among the many academic honors she has received, she was awarded a Fulbright and two Andrew W. Mellon Fellowships. In recognition of her contributions to French culture, Easton was appointed Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French Government in 2008.

She has served as a trustee of the Town School, the Spence School, Studio in a School, the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR), is on the Visiting Committee of the Department of Paintings Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and is on the advisory boards of a number of other cultural institutions.

Agnes Gund

Agnes Gund

Co-Founder and Chair, CCL

President Emerita, Museum of Modern Art; Chair, MoMA PS1; Trustee, Cleveland Museum of Art

Agnes Gund is President Emerita of the Museum of Modern Art and Chair of its International Council. She is also Chair of MoMA PS1 Contemporary Art Center. Ms. Gund joined the MoMA Board in 1976 and served as its President from 1991 until 2002. She is the Founder and a Trustee of Studio in a School Association, a non-profit organization she established in 1977 in response to budget cuts that virtually eliminated arts classes from New York City public schools. In January 2012, Ms. Gund was appointed Member of the New York State Council on the Arts. A philanthropist and collector of modern and contemporary art, Ms. Gund is Chair of the Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission of New York City, and currently serves on the boards of Chess in the Schools, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, and Socrates Sculpture Park, among others. She is co-founder of the Center for Curatorial Leadership and an Honorary Trustee of the Independent Curators International as well as the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. A civic leader and staunch supporter of education, women’s issues and environmental concerns, among other causes, Ms Gund has served on the boards of such wide-ranging organizations as the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and the Fund for Public Schools. She earned a B.A. in History from Connecticut College and a M.A. in Art History from Harvard University. She has since received numerous honorary doctorate degrees, including honors from CUNY Graduate Center (2007) and Brown University (1996).

Sarah Van Anden

Sarah Van Anden

Senior Program Manager, Center for Curatorial Leadership

Sarah Van Anden joined the CCL in 2016 as the Senior Program Manager, leading program planning, strategic initiatives, communications, and fundraising. She works with fellows, alumni, supporters, and the Board of Trustees to develop and carry out the organization’s full-schedule of activities. Prior to CCL, Sarah was a Program Officer with the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. As a member of the Programs Unit she oversaw a portfolio of more than 140 New York City cultural organizations and helped distribute over $30 million annually through the Cultural Development Fund, the City’s open, competitive funding process for arts nonprofits. In her earlier position at the Shelley and Donald Rubin family office, she was part of the curatorial team responsible for organizing exhibitions and programs extending from the Rubins’ philanthropic activities.

Ms. Van Anden received her M.A. in the History of Art from Williams College where her interests were focused on art collecting in early-modern Europe. Her additional experiences include positions and internships with McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Art in America, the Center for the History of Collecting at the Frick Art Reference Library, and Research and Academic Programs at the Clark Art Institute. She completed her B.A. at Temple University, graduating cum laude with a dual major in History and Art History. Ms. Van Anden currently serves on the steering committee for the Professional Organization of Women in the Arts (POWarts) and on the board of the New York chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA).

Joseph Shaikewitz

Joseph Shaikewitz

Executive Programs Assistant, Center for Curatorial Leadership

Joseph Shaikewitz joined the CCL in 2016 where he oversees the full scope of the organization’s programming as well as communications. Prior to his current role, Mr. Shaikewitz held jobs and internships at the Baltimore Museum of Art, The Contemporary, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and The Phillips Collection. His curated projects include Surface Tension at Current Space and Thomas Teurlai: Foot Locker at the Copycat Building, both in Baltimore, MD.

Mr. Shaikewitz graduated with honors from The Johns Hopkins University in 2015 with a B.A. in the History of Art and a minor in Museums & Society. He spent a year directly-enrolled at the École du Louvre in Paris and subsequently completed an honors thesis on the de-privileging of spectatorship in the work of Pierre Huyghe. A practicing art critic, he has contributed writing to publications including BmoreArt, Scroll, and Post-Office Arts Journal.

Joel Brockner

Joel Brockner

Faculty Advisor, Columbia Business School

Phillip Hettleman Professor of Business, Columbia Business School

Joel Brockner earned a B.A. in psychology from SUNY-Stony Brook in 1972, and a Ph.D. in social/personality psychology from Tufts University in 1977. Since that time, he has taught at Middlebury College, SUNY College at Brockport, Tufts University, and the University of Arizona prior to joining the faculty at Columbia Business School in 1984.

Professor Brockner is a leading authority on a variety of psychological issues in the workplace, including change management (e.g., the effects of layoffs on the productivity and morale of survivors), leadership, decision-making, the role of the self, and cross-cultural differences in work behavior. He has published three books (one on decision making in “sunk cost” situations, one on the causes and consequences of employees’ self esteem, and one on the role of justice in the workplace). In addition, he has published more than 100 articles and book chapters in a variety of prestigious outlets, including Administrative Science Quarterly, the Harvard Business Review, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology to name a few.

He has served (or is currently serving) on the Editorial Board of numerous journals in the fields of management and psychology including the Academy of Management Journal, the Academy of Management Review, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. He also is frequently called on to review for the National Science Foundation. Professor Brockner is a Fellow of the Academy of Management, and he is also a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division of Industrial and Organizational Psychology).

Joel is the former Chairman of the Management Division at Columbia Business School, and he also is the Faculty Director of several highly regarded executive education program at Columbia Business School, including High Impact Leadership, Leadership Essentials, China CEO, and the Social Enterprise offering, The Developing Leaders Program. In addition, he has served as an expert witness, and he has consulted to a variety of organizations (including Association of Art Museum Curators, Canadian Health Services Research Foundation, Citigroup, ConocoPhillips, Eastman Kodak, IXIS Capital Markets, MBNA, Pfizer, State Farm Insurance, Southern New England Telephone, and Stratus Technologies) about the planning and implementation of significant organizational change, leadership development, decision making, and negotiation behavior.

Raymond Horton

Raymond Horton

Founding Faculty Advisor to CCL, Columbia Business School

Frank R. Lautenberg Professor of Ethics and Corporate Governance; Founder, Social Enterprise Program; Faculty Director, Programs in Social Enterprise in Executive Education

Raymond D. Horton served as CCL's faculty advisor from its inaugural class in 2008 to 2015. He is the Frank R. Lautenberg Professor of Ethics and Corporate Governance at the Columbia Business School, where he also serves as Director of the Social Enterprise Program. He received his B.A. from Grinnell College in 1962, J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1965, and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 1971. A member of Columbia Business School faculty since 1970, he served as Executive Director of the Temporary Commission on City Finances from 1975 to 1977. After returning to Columbia, he founded the Setting Municipal Priorities Project with Charles Brecher, and co-edited, with Brecher, the ten volumes in that series. Between 1980 and 1998, Horton held the positions of Research Director and President with the Citizens Budget Commission. The Commission is a public advocate of responsible financial management in New York City and New York State. His writings include numerous books, articles, and reports in the field of State and local finance and politics. His most recent book, Power Failure: New York City Government in the Post-1960 Era, was published by Oxford University Press in 1993. In addition to his academic responsibilities, Horton has served on a number of private and nonprofit boards. Horton was born and raised in Iowa, but has lived in New York City since 1965. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife Jacqueline, and daughters Justine and Georgia. His son Radley received his doctorate in Environmental Science at Columbia University.