Board of Trustees

Agnes Gund

Agnes Gund

Co-Founder and Chair Emerita

President Emerita, Museum of Modern Art; Founder and Chair, Studio in a School

Agnes Gund is president emerita of the Museum of Modern Art and chair of its International Council. She is also chair emerita of MoMA PS1. Ms. Gund joined the MoMA Board in 1976 and served as president from 1991 until 2002.

Ms. Gund is founder and chair emerita of Studio in a School, a non-profit organization she established in 1977 in response to budget cuts that virtually eliminated arts classes from New York City public schools.

A philanthropist and collector of modern and contemporary art, Ms. Gund serves on the boards of the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies, and the Morgan Library & Museum. She is co-founder and chair of the Center for Curatorial Leadership, as well as an honorary trustee of the National YoungArts Foundation, Independent Curators International, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. 

A civic leader and staunch supporter of education, environmental concerns and social justice, Ms. Gund has served on the boards of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Barnes Foundation, Chess in the Schools, the Frick Collection, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the New York City Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission, and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, among others. In June 2017, she launched the Art for Justice Fund in partnership with the Ford Foundation and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors to support criminal justice reform in the U.S. 

Ms. Gund earned a B.A. in History from Connecticut College and an M.A. in Art History from Harvard University. She holds honorary doctorates from Bowdoin College (2012), the CUNY Graduate Center (2007), and Brown University (1996), and was elected Honorary Fellow of the Royal Academy of Arts (2016). Ms. Gund received the National Medal of the Arts from President Clinton (1997), the J. Paul Getty Medal (2018) and the inaugural Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Woman of Leadership Award (2020).

Ed Henry

Ed Henry

Chair

Former President and CEO, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation 

Ed Henry was appointed president and CEO of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in January 2009. The foundation supports grants programs in the performing arts, the environment, medical research and child well-being. The work of the foundation is supported by an endowment of approximately $1.8 billion. He also serves as president of several operating foundations, including the Duke Farms Foundation, which is focused on environmental stewardship, and the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, which operates a center for the study of Islamic arts and cultures and "Building Bridges," a related grants program.

Previously he was an associate dean at Columbia Business School and continues as an adjunct faculty member. He has held senior administrative positions with a number of nonprofit institutions and was a David Rockefeller fellow with the Partnership for New York City.

Henry earned a degree in economics from the University of Michigan and business from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Much earlier in life he was a dancer with the New York City-based companies of Dan Wagoner and Viola Farber, had the opportunity to perform throughout the United States and abroad, served in the Artists-in-Schools program, created work for a number of venues and participated as a peer reviewer for federal, state and local funding organizations.

Kimerly Rorschach

Kimerly Rorschach

Secretary

Former Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO, Seattle Art Museum

Kimerly Rorschach joined the Seattle Art Museum as the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO in November of 2012 and retired in 2019. Under her leadership, the museum’s operations, artistic and educational programs thrived. She led SAM’s development of a three year strategic plan that builds on the achievements of SAM’s massive 2007 expansion, which resulted in three unique sites for SAM: downtown’s flagship Museum, the Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park, and the Olympic Sculpture Park located on the waterfront. During her tenure, the museum has organized major exhibitions and important acquisitions have been added to SAM’s global collection. Rorschach was also instrumental in organizing Miró: The Experience of Seeing, a collaboration with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, which was on view at SAM in spring of 2014 and now on tour in the U.S.

Prior to SAM, Rorschach served as the Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Under her direction, the Nasher Museum opened to the public in 2005 and quickly built a dynamic program focusing on modern and contemporary art and service to the university and broader community, and attained a reputation as a leading university art museum. Rorschach established the museum as the cornerstone for the arts at Duke. She chaired Duke's Council on the Arts, working to promote the arts as one of five priorities in the university's strategic plan.

In prior roles, Rorschach was the Dana Feitler Director of the University of Chicago's David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art for 10 years and has held curatorial positions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia.

Rorschach is a past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors. In addition, she is a Trustee with the American Federation of Arts, New York, and serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Curatorial Leadership (founded by Agnes Gund). She has edited and written for numerous catalogues, journals and news publications.

Rorschach was a Fulbright Scholar, holds a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University and earned a B.A. from Brandeis University.

Anita Contini

Anita Contini

Trustee At-Large

Arts Program Lead, Bloomberg Philanthropies

Anita Contini joined Bloomberg Philanthropies in 2010 as the Arts Program Lead.  Through the Arts Program, Bloomberg Philanthropies helps small and mid-size cultural organizations strengthen long-term organizational capacity, supports temporary public art projects that enrich the vibrancy of cities, and helps leading cultural institutions globally implement cutting-edge technology projects that transform visitor experience. Bloomberg Philanthropies also collaborates with some of the nation’s top foundations, federal agencies, and banks to invest in projects where artists and arts organizations play a central role in shaping their communities’ social, physical, and economic future.

Prior to joining Bloomberg Philanthropies, Anita was Senior Vice President and Director of Corporate Public Affairs and Philanthropy at CIT Group.  From 2002 to 2005, she served as Vice President and Director of the WTC Memorial, Cultural, and Civic Programs at the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation.  She developed a process and implementation plan for the 9/11 World Trade Center memorial, including the jury process for selecting its designer.

Previously, Anita served as First Vice President of Global Sponsorships and Client Events Marketing at Merrill Lynch, where she managed the firm’s giving and client program and as Vice President and Artistic Director of World Financial Center Arts and Events/Marketing for Brookfield Properties.

In 1974, Anita founded Creative Time, an award-winning nonprofit arts organization, and was its Director and President until 1987. 

She has received a number of awards for distinguished public service, including from the Municipal Arts Society, Hofstra University, AIA New York Chapter, ArtTable, and the Downtown Lower Manhattan Business Association.

Anita currently serves on the boards of the Center for Curatorial Leadership, The Drawing Center, DataArts, Grantmakers in the Arts, and Publicolor.  She is on the Operating Committee for ArtPlace America and a member of ArtTable.

Courtney J Martin

Courtney J Martin

Trustee At-Large

Director, Yale Center for British Art

In 2019, Courtney J. Martin became the sixth director of the Yale Center for British Art. Previously, she was the deputy director and chief curator at the Dia Art Foundation; an assistant professor in the History of Art and Architecture department at Brown University; an assistant professor in the History of Art department at Vander­bilt University; a chancellor’s postdoctoral fellow in the History of Art at the University of California, Berkeley; a fellow at the Getty Research Institute; and a Henry Moore Institute research fellow. She also worked in the media, arts, and culture unit of the Ford Foundation in New York. In 2015, she received an Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant.

In 2012, Martin curated the exhibition Drop, Roll, Slide, Drip . . . Frank Bowling’s Poured Paintings 1973–1978 at Tate Britain. In 2014, she co-curated the group show Minimal Baroque: Post-Minimalism and Contemporary Art at Rønnebæksholm in Denmark. From 2008 to 2015, she co-led a research project on the Anglo-American art critic Lawrence Alloway at the Getty Research Institute and was co-editor of Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator (Getty Publications, 2015, winner of the 2016 Historians of British Art Book Award). In 2015, she curated an exhibition at the Dia Art Foundation focused on the American painter Robert Ryman. At Dia, she also oversaw exhibitions of works by Dan Flavin, Sam Gilliam, Blinky Palermo, Dorothea Rockburne, Keith Sonnier, and Andy Warhol. She was editor of the book Four Generations: The Joyner Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art (Gregory R. Miller & Co., 2016), surveying an important collection of modern and contemporary work by artists of African descent.

She received a bachelor of arts from Oberlin College and a doctorate from Yale University for her research on twentieth-century British art and is the author of essays on Rasheed Araeen, Kader Attia, Rina Banerjee, Frank Bowling, Lara Favaretto, Sam Gilliam, Leslie Hewitt, Asger Jorn, Wangechi Mutu, Ed Ruscha, and Yinka Shonibare CBE (RA).

She was a participant in the Center for Curatorial Leadership’s fellowship in 2019.

Marnie Pillsbury

Marnie Pillsbury

Trustee at-Large

Former Philanthropic Advisor and Executive Director, David Rockefeller Fund

Marnie Pillsbury is Philanthropic Advisor to David Rockefeller and served as Executive Director of the David Rockefeller Fund from 1990 until 2014.  She serves on the board of Rockefeller University, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, International Women’s Health Coalition, Pinkerton Foundation and the Center for Curatorial Leadership.  She is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Council of the Museum of Modern Art.

A graduate of Wellesley College, Pillsbury received an M.B.A. from the New York University Stern School of Business in 1987.

Susan S. Sawyers

Susan S. Sawyers

Trustee At-Large

 

Susan S. Sawyers is an early-stage investor in women-led technology companies, a working photographer and strategist with experience in the arts, education and journalism. She advocates for moral leadership and creativity in business, and everyday life.

Sawyers earned a master’s degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and she is also a graduate of the International Center of Photography and Grinnell College. She began her career as a legislative aide and French teacher in Washington, D.C. and taught English and wrote for a local newspaper as a Fulbright-Hayes Teaching Assistant in Paimpol, France. After graduate school, Sawyers produced Bloomberg Radio’s Bloomberg EDU, Bloomberg Radio’s award-winning weekly look at education. Her writing and reporting have appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, The Huffington Post, The Hechinger Report and New York Social Diary. She has written about education, philanthropy and women in society.

Sawyers was assistant vice president at Christie’s and then served as director and curator of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation. These experiences sparked her interest in fostering the work of living artists.

Sawyers is a founding donor of The 19th News, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting on gender, politics and policy. She is also a supporter of The New York Women’s Foundation, Determined to Succeed, For Freedoms, a member of Solidaire, and an advisor to The Hechinger Report. She has supported young people as a coach for Do Something and The Future Project and was a teaching assistant at the International Center of Photography. She coaches first generation college and graduate students in New York City.

Susan lives in New York City with her husband, Charles Sawyers, M.D. Dr. Sawyers is the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Chair in Human Oncology and Pathogenesis and the Chair, Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Alice Tisch

Alice Tisch

Trustee At-Large

Trustee, MoMA

Alice Tisch engages in a variety of volunteer activities, with a special focus on arts, health and social services, and education. She serves on the Board and Executive Committee of the Museum of Modern Art where she also chairs the museum's Acquisitions Department of Architecture & Design. She serves as President of the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services, NY State's largest social service agency. She serves as trustee of the NYU Langone Medical Center, having headed their pediatrics initiative, KiDS of NYU, for over twenty years. An alumna of Wellesley College and Columbia University Business School, Alice and her husband, Thomas, have four children. They live in NYC.

Michelle Joan Wilkinson

Michelle Joan Wilkinson

Trustee At-Large

Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Michelle Joan Wilkinson, Ph.D. is a curator at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), where she works on projects related to contemporary black life. She is the co-curator of two inaugural exhibitions at the NMAAHC: A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond and A Century in the Making: Building the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Wilkinson is also developing the museum’s collections in architecture and design.

Prior to NMAAHC, spent six years as Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture. In that capacity, she curated over twenty exhibitions, including the critically-acclaimed A People’s Geography: The Spaces of African American Life, and two award-winning shows: For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People and Material Girls: Contemporary Black Women Artists.

Wilkinson holds a B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. from Emory University. From 1999-2002, she was an assistant professor of African American, Puerto Rican, and Caribbean literature at Bard College in New York. In 2002, Wilkinson entered the museum field seeking to fulfill her passion for the arts, writing, scholarly research, and public engagement. Since then, she has worked on exhibitions, publications, and public programs for the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and at the Studio Museum in Harlem, where she held the position of Editor and Library Coordinator.

Wilkinson’s research interests range from African American and African Diaspora cultural studies to global architecture and design. Wilkinson was a 2012 fellow of the Center for Curatorial Leadership in New York City, and completed a short-term residency at the Design Museum in London as part of her fellowship. Her honors and awards include fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in London. Her interdisciplinary research project, “V is for Veranda,” about architectural heritage in the Anglophone Caribbean, has been presented to international audiences in Suriname, England, India, and the United States.

Wilkinson is active on several boards and committees in the museum field. She is the editor of For Whom It Stands: The Flag and the American People and she has published critical essays in New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement and Potentially Harmful: The Art of American Censorship. Her writing also has appeared in the International Review of African American Art, ARC Magazine: Contemporary Caribbean Visual Art and Culture, Studio: The Studio Museum in Harlem Magazine, Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism, Black Issues Book Review, and Revue Noire: Art Contemporain Africain, among others.